biogas

BIOGAS COSTA RICA

Biogas Discussions


biogas discussions

Biogas Discussions

Comments about biogas pages on the website

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So, let me know what questions you have about the project and the construction of the biodigesters we built in Costa Rica. I am writing on behalf of a group first year university students studying various forms of engineering at Flinders University. We are undertaking a project involving waste management in a developing region. Consequently, we are openly seeking any information/advice that you or your organisation may be able to offer, regarding the treatment and handling of human waste, preferably with a view towards recycling/reusing the material in some way (as feed for a bio-process, perhaps). I am looking for good businesses to profile Thank you, Thomas Carmona I am a high school student planning to do some research about biogas production from cow dung for a school project. If can help me I am interested to know how much methane is produced by a 20 m3 biogas plant assuming every thing is at ideal conditions. The biomass to be used is cow dung only. Could it generate at least 20kw-25kw power? If not how large should the plant be? If you are in a position please kindly supply me the details because I need them very quickly. I thank you for the great help done.Sorry I can't help you out. I really don't have any good metrics for biogas production, and neither do I have experience in converting it to electricity. I will investigate these things myself, though, and should have some answers, or resources to find those answers, some time in the next few months. Good luck on your research. If you find anything good, you might be kind enough to send it my way??? Please allow me to introduce myself. My name is Jean Cassandra, i am a US Peace Corps Volunteer working in Northern Peru. I live and work mainly with rural farmers and recently it has come to some of the farmers attentions that they can use the manure of their animals and food leftovers to make gas. With some of these workers we have begun our investigation and are very interested in this project. However, we are faulting technical help. I have come across your project that took place in Costa Rica and i would like to learn more. If you can tell me anything and everything about your project and i how we could possibly receive technical help that would be great. Thanks for your time, Jean Cassandrat's quite the coincidence that you e-mail me while I'm a med-evac here in Washington with two of your friends, Dennis and Emily. In fact, Dennis was telling me about your success as a "running machine." You win marathons in the Andes? That's pretty bad ass for a lowlands girl. Anyway, to give you help on a potential biogas project, I would have to know more about your situation (how much livestock people generally have, what kind of animals). I also need to know that you've read all the material on the web site. If you've done this and still have questions, please ask me those specific questions. To get technical help from people locally, which I recommend, try working with a local agriculture ministry, if one exists. There may also be an NGO around there that works with biogas. As I get a lot of e-mails from Peru, I'm sure people have already tried biogas in the country. As far as funding opportunities go, I know that a UNDP environmental program has funded biodigester projects in Costa Rica. Ask your PC staff in Peru about the existence of this program in your country. So, let me know what questions you have about the project and the construction of the biodigesters we built in Costa Rica. I am writing on behalf of a group first year university students studying various forms of engineering at Flinders University. We are undertaking a project involving waste management in a developing region. Consequently, we are openly seeking any information/advice that you or your organisation may be able to offer, regarding the treatment and handling of human waste, preferably with a view towards recycling/reusing the material in some way (as feed for a bio-process, perhaps). Did you read the material on the web site? The same principles apply to human waste. However, I don't have experience using septic tanks for biogas production. I'll be happy to answer any questions on the web site's material. i have had the biodigester on hold as we've been flat out building ponds with bull dozers and back hoes so have not been able to let them out of sight. i >>am >>looking to build a biogas digester using pig manure and saw the one you >>built with the santa fe womens group. i am very keen to build one too! >> >>we have roughly 30 pigs but want to build a small fattening up shelter to >>house between 4 and 6 pigs. the pigs will be of different ages to provide >>a >>steady flow of meat throughout the year, bringing in smaller ones as the >>larger pigs are taken to slaughter. >> >>we don't feed our pigs concentrate, they eat kitchen left overs, coconut, >>different banana varieties and root crops so quite a diverse diet. >> >>my first question is; will 4-6 pigs provide enough manure on a daily basis >>to maintain a biodigester of the dimensions you state? >> >>secondly, if we reduce the depth of the tank to 1.5m and lengthen it to 4m >>will that have any effect. we have very sandy/rocky soil so to dig deep >>usually results in the sides of the wall collapsing resulting in endless >>work! what do you think the minimum depth can be? >> >>thirdly, we want to use the concrete base of the pig house (with a line of >>block around the sides) to mix the manure (with the correct ratio of >>water) >>before flushing it into the biodigester tank . the floor will be elevated >>above the tank and will have a slight inclination in level towards the >>entrance tube. it doesn't nessessarily have to have a seperate mixing tub >>does it? >> >>and finally, can i do without a collection tub and run the excess water >>directly into a swale (a ditch on contour and planted out) to discharge? >> >>thank you very much for your time. I am a student at Dartmouth College working with HELP, a humanitarian engineering organization. We are working on designing and implementing a small scale biogas digester at a health clinic in northern Rwanda this summer, similar to the one outlined on your website. Your site has been helpful to us and I would be very interested in making contact with you to gain more information. Please check out our website, http://engineering.dartmouth.edu/helpworldwide/, and reply if you are interested in adding your knowledge to this project. I'm a former Peace Corps Volunteer in Costa Rica. I continue to use my web site, http://www.ruralcostarica.com , for a nascent rural tourism project. The site also has pages that describe the Santa Fe Wonen's Group's projects (also related to planned rural tourism activities), including its biogas project in which the women managed the construction of 16 biodigester tanks that use cow manure to create gas for cooking. I invite you to check out http://www.ruralcostarica.com/biogas.html and http://www.ruralcostarica.com/biodigester.html . You might find the makings of a good article. Happy new year.I was oppuntuned to come across your article on the website on how to use biogas as a cooking fuel.Sincerely I was impressed and thrilled how it has helped solved economic problems in Costarica,and so I decided to write this letter,primarily to seek a form of assistance in building a biogas plant that would use human waste(faeces). Iam a student of microbiology department in a state University based in Nigeria,WestAfrica. And this is Imo state university. In fact, I am working on the use of biogas as cooking fuel, and the role of microorganisms in the production of this biogas, as part of my finalyear work. So I would like to get some support in the following areas: - article on biogas production using human waste from house toilet. - the cost of installing such biogas plant In Nigeria as pilot project(low cost biogas plant) - where I can get technical assistance if such project is to commence soon.Pls I would be glad if you send me neccesary information on this issue as quick as possible. I would very much like to visit the biogas installation, if possible. Can i just come by. Where can i come and meet people who can show me such an installation. my name is maha fuqha iam studding chemical engineering in An-Najah National University in palestine i have aproject this year about biogas production and its plants so i need every information about this plants and how it works I will soon be publishing more biogas pages on the web site, but in the meantime I can answer any specific question you have. I am in the U.S. I have been conducting resarch on the development of biogas disgesters for home heating and cooking. I was very impressed with the work your group has done as shown on the rural costa rica web site. I was wondering if you know if the project has ever been built anywhere in the U.S. Also, if you can provide any more information in addition to what has been posted on your website that would be greatly appreiciated. Thank you. J. Pittell We don't have anything that we send out besides what is explained on the web site. I don't know if anything similar has been done in the United States. Most of the U.S. biodigesters that I know of are for large farms, costing upwards of a million dollars. One barrier to cutting costs with US biodigesters is the cold winter. The anaerobic bacteria will not produce gas very well under conditions lower than 70 degrees Fahrenheit. Here in Costa Rica we have the advantage of not needing a heating unit for gas production at any point in the year. Let me know if you have any specific questions about the instructions on the web site. for a new Wisconsin website I'm developing, WisconsinUpClose.com. Since I already have some experience with biogas, I want to feature your business to add to my already-prominent editorial content. If you would like this free publicity, an interview can be arranged either by e-mail, phone, or in person. Please let me know if you're interested, and whether you have a representative in the Madison I am in the process of planning a trip to and through Latin America, with the purpose of gaining some practical experience with greenhouse gas mitigation, and sustainable farming. I am a student of both though, right now, I am facing a rut without teachers that are willing to mentor Independent Study. I thought this would be the ideal time to venture out. I am in contact with a number of WWOOF farms and some of them have ambitions to build a biogas digester. Despite an academic interest in the greenhouse gas economics of using factory-scale digesters, such as is done co-operatively in Denmark, I don't have any practical experience building them (and, truth be told, I really need to be walked through anything involving hands-on construction). Nevertheless, I am a very hard worker, and I would love to come down and help build a digester to be able to take the knowledge with me to the rest of the places I travel to. Let me know if you have projects beginning soon, especially those starting earlier than many farms go into their labor-intensive periods. I'm Thomas Carmona, Peace Corps volunteer in Santa Fe and webmaster for the Women's Group's web site. We would be happy to plan the construction for you. There are plenty of people who would love to have a biodigester. I can talk with the group to see how we can set up the construction of another biodigester. We can locate a farmer who wants to build one and can assign someone who has a lot of construction experience to the project. You will be able to work alongside the family and the assigned craftsman in the construction of the biodigester (except for the digging of the hole by hand, which would make your stay unnecessarily long). I will talk to the group about the possibilities for your stay. In the meantime, any other comments about what you would like to get out of this would help me figure out the best way to set up your digester experience here. If you are wondering about the price of any/all of this, I must say that I don't know. There aren't many farmers who can spare the cash for materials (around $300), which is the limitation that local people have for the continuation of the biogas project. If you are willing to pay for the materials, the project would run much smoother. Thanks for your interest in biogas. I hope we can help you out in your independent study.

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